Product Review: Logitech K375s

Product Review: Logitech K375s

Most of my office work requires writing and editing, and typing for long hours on a laptop is tiresome. Besides, having a wireless keyboard gives me the privilege to move away from the screen as I type my way to glory—well, kind of. This is why I decided to purchase an external keyboard for my laptop.

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After researching, I decided on buying the Logitech K375s because of its dual connection feature. I can use either the Bluetooth connection on my laptop or insert the Unifying USB to connect it wirelessly. I liked having this option because even though my smart TV is Internet-enabled, using its tiny remote and the limiting rubber keys to type and search for a YouTube video is both painful and time-consuming.

I found that on either the USB or the Bluetooth, the connection between the keyboard and the laptop was stable. Even when I kept the keyboard on idle, the connection remained stable. After a while, when I began typing, the words flowed as freely as I had wished for—at least, in the context of the keyboard. The truth is that despite how good a keyboard one gets, writing continues to be a tough job.

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The keyboard can be connected to three devices. I have connected it to my laptop and cellphone. So, I can type on either by switching between them with the click of a button. While there are a lot of them who’d prefer connecting it via Bluetooth, I have experienced that the connection via the wireless USB receiver is more stable. This, I have found to be valid for both the keyboard and the mouse. But, once I connect my keyboard to the laptop via the Unifying USB, I have to remove the keyboard from the Bluetooth pairing list and add it back before I connect it via Bluetooth. This is weird, unnecessary, and—I assume—faulty.

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Logitech claims a battery life of about six months with heavy use. But I am yet to cross the six months timeline. So, I can’t really confirm if that is true.

The standard components of the packaging include the keyboard, the Unifying USB receiver, two AAA batteries, and a mobile (or tablet) stand. The stand is of good-quality plastic, but I would have liked to see some rubber padding on the bottom. This would have provided additional grip to the stand. The stand is sturdy and inclined at the correct angle to hold even my iPad Mini (with its cover) at a proper viewing angle.

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Shockingly, when I received the package, the USB receiver was not there in it. But, my supplier, Golchha IT, was kind enough to ship the missing USB receiver to me for free. In fact, they followed-up on the delivery for me. Such a showcase of professionalism and ethics is worth quoting.

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The keyboard comes with decent construction quality. While the keys are easy to press and have a clicky feel, they are a bit on the noisy side, and the down arrow key didn’t always respond in the first attempt. I think this device I received was shelved for a long time.

As for the arrangement of the keys, I have a suggestion—in case Logitech is reading this. The Function (fn) key is placed on the bottom right-hand side of the alphabets.

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But there is a context to the point I am making. Even though Logitech made K375s an OS-independent keyboard, there may be a lot of those—like me—who would use this keyboard while using a Microsoft Word application on a MacBook Pro.

The keyboard shortcut for changing the case in the Microsoft Word application is shift+F3. But the F1, F2, and F3 keys can also be used to switch between the Bluetooth-connected devices on the keyboard. This means I have to press the fn+shift+F3 button to change the casing.

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If I do not press the fn key, I accidentally end up refreshing or resetting the connection between the keyboard and the connected device. The overall positioning of particularly that combination of keys makes it awfully awkward for me to use that shortcut. Had they placed the fn key on the left-hand side, they would have resolved this issue, especially for people with small hands.

As a workaround, I can use the mouse. But, it is an added task when I am writing. Because my mind is already occupied in doing mental edits before words come out. Thankfully, I don’t often use that shortcut, and I am yet to come across another equally awkward keyboard shortcut.

Pay attention to this space.

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This is clearly the wastage of space, which I think should have been used for switching between devices, so that the function keys could have been left intact. Also, the arrangement of the Function key and the absence of a slot to carry the USB receiver mean that this wasn’t clearly one of the most thought out designs from Logitech. I think they should have looked at how Apple has made space for the key on their Magic/Butterfly keyboard.

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In the time that I spent with this keyboard, I have noted some good and some not-so-good points about it:

  • I’d give full marks to its stable connectivity, and for having the connectivity options: so, a 5/5. (Five, being the highest)
  • This isn’t one of the most beautiful keyboards. It isn’t the latest one, either. So, a decent 3.5 on 5.
  • I expect all keys to work flawlessly. Besides, the USB receiver was missing when I purchased it. Even though the supplier shipped the Unifying USB receiver, the initial experience has had a lasting impression on me. I’d give it 2 on 5.
  • I’ve already shared my opinion on the design. So, an average 3 on 5.

This is my review of the Logitech K375s. I hope you like it.

The Two Sides of Writing

“Everybody can write. But not everybody can become a writer.” Is that true? How and why? A question like this surfaced during our interaction.

In my previous post, I shared with you what writing has brought to me. In this post, we will discuss what people, like you and, I often bring back to writing.

Writing is Natural

The only mechanical parts in writing, today, are the brain and the hands. The other parts are intangible. And some parts that were previously tangible have now been taken care of using the software. We can monitor and control the efficiency of hands. But we can neither control nor accurately monitor the effectiveness of the brain. That’s because, when writing, we are looking through a dirty mirror. The messier its reflection is, the less clearly we see. But, with practice, we can clean the mirror. The better we look through to our real, actual selves, the better we write.

Unlike painters and sculptors, writing doesn’t involve long hours of practice every day. Unlike singers or dancers, writing does not need to be taught by gurus.


Writing is a skillful art that can be learned without anyone teaching it.


A lot of people write every day. Even if you were to write something as short as of 500 words every day, which usually takes not more than 30 minutes, you could hone your writing skills in as little as a year. Without ever using the principles of a good story, it is still possible for you to create a useful account. Logically enough, people will either read their way through it or sleep their way through it. The choice becomes more evident if your work of fiction comes as a hardcover.

Writing is Mechanical

A lot of people often have commented that “writing is a creative process.” But what they don’t realize is that while they lay stress on the word “creative,” they must equally stress the word “process.” The fact that it is as much a process as creativity means that step B cannot begin until step A is finished.

To be able to say what you have to, you must put your words in a certain way. The result may be delayed, but it must explain what you intend to. For this, you must abide by the rules of grammar and structure. Not only that, even while you say things in a flow, or let your fingertips be the narrators of your great story, it is your mind that must sieve that story through filters for quality purposes. This mechanical process of flowing from ‘knowing the science’ to ‘practicing the science’ as you write is a costly affair. First, it doesn’t come easy. Second, its only triggers are failures and rejections. But then, Rome wasn’t built in a day, was it?


The person who crafts the art isn’t always the same person who explains the creation.


Simple thoughts often invoke smiles that no one can see, except for one’s own mind. It is thoughts like these that underpin humor. This is why, even when writing provides one the license to think without boundaries, the writer must attribute the boundlessness to rationality and reasoning. So long as your characters and their behaviors remain deducible, they remain real, relatable.

Conclusion

As you might have observed, the parameters that define the two sides of writing are often confusing and intertwined. During my post-graduation, we were taught that “management is a scientific art and artistic science.” I’d like to think that that definition suits more to writing than to management.

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Any skill that requires you to follow a process has to have mechanics. Anything that is coded within the rules of a language needs artistic intuition to unfold its true, magical potential.