Product Review: Kanwrite Heritage Fountain Pen and Krishna Lyrebird Turquoise Blue Ink

Ever since I’ve begun seriously cultivating my newfound hobby of collecting and using fountain pens, two things have happened, both of which were, sort of, but understood: my clarity of thoughts and handwriting have improved. But, those are in addition to the “wows” I receive when I flaunt my collection. Today’s post is about the latest addition to this collection: a Kanwrite Heritage.

For a combination, I chose the Pearl Green color and teamed it with the Krishna Lyrebird Everyday Turquoise Blue ink. This combination, I must say, has come out really well. Really well—worth the repetition, that is.

Built and Construction

The pen is made of good-quality acrylic. It is a bit on the heavier side, but the construction is such that the pen is balanced at the center when fully refilled. The pen is 14.1 cms in length when capped, 16.4 cms when posted, and 13.1 cms when uncapped.

The pen comes with a piston-filler mechanism, which is easy to use and clean. You can open the nib unit and see through to the very end of the pen with the piston sitting flush. I will also say that the piston mechanism doesn’t leave room for ink or air to seep through. I tried cleaning the pen once; not a single droplet seeped through to the other side of the piston.

Nib

I got a Broad one, but it feels more like Medium to Broad. On occasions, I got Broad strokes, but mostly it leans more toward the Medium width. For comparison, I wrote using my Guider Medium ebonite, which, too, uses a Broad nib. But, the Guider one writes more between Broad and Double-Broad.

This nib on the Kanwrite Heritage is Kanpur Writers’ in-house international #6 equivalent steel nib, and I must say that it performs really well out of the box. The nib unit is interchangeable, and for reference, I also have an Ultra-flex that goes from Extra Fine to Double Broad. The flex is nice and springy, but the nib and feed need to be tuned for scratchiness and flow, respectively.

Both nib units for the Kanwrite Heritage (the Ultra-flex nib and Broad nib ones) come with an ebonite feed. And, within the time I have used it, I didn’t experience even a single instance of the ink drying overnight with the pen standing upright in my pen stand. Overall, it is a nib unit that is easy to install, easier to clean, and easiest to get used to.

Ink

I’ve used Krishna Super Rich series inks before. So, I wasn’t new to the brand or the experience. However, I will say that even though the Lyrebird series is a tad cheaper, it is in no way any lesser than the Super Rich series in terms of quality. I liked the ink saturation, the flow, and the drying time. Only a few shades of ink can truly be called turquoise, and the Lyrebird Everyday Turquoise Blue Ink is one. It sits comfortably between blue and green.

The “every day” in the name of the ink justifies that the color doesn’t irritate you. It doesn’t pinch you in the eye, so you can use it every day. It is bright enough to appear lively yet sufficiently dark to appear correctly on your paper. The ink is a sibling of Monsoon Sky from Krishna Ink’s Super Rich series.

For comparison, I dropped a few drops of both colors. Turquoise, by definition, is a step or two towards green. Monsoon Sky is exactly what its name suggests. Lyrebird has better contrast, but Monsoon Sky spreads better. Also, the base tone of Monsoon Sky, I found, to be toward a much lighter shade of blue.

That shade difference aside, it is the inks’ behavior that made me curious. You can tell that the Super Rich Series is a bit more watery and might trickle down into pages that follow. Also, in my observations, the Lyrebird ink dries more quickly. So, it must be better for calligraphy or pen art.

Where to Buy

I bought the pen from The Pen World (http://www.thepenworld.com). It has one of the most sorted collections for those starting with this hobby of collecting or using fountain pens. The prices are affordable, but the range goes beyond the scope of my willingness to invest for now. You could, alternatively, buy the pen directly from Kanpur Writers’ website, www.kanpurwriters.com, as it might have a nib option that might interest you more. Either way, your purchase decision will be in sorted hands.

Speaking of sorted, I think it is time to sort things to their conclusion. 🙂

Conclusion

I don’t have any complaints; in fact, I’m in love with this pen. From the time I inked it, the pen has never skipped once. The ink flow is butter smooth, and the ink doesn’t irritate my eyes. In terms of the aesthetics, it is one of the most sorted (there I go again!) combinations of pen and ink color.