philosophy

It is always good to keep your (in)abilities well bracketed. #suyogsutra

I know what I can do. But, I also know what I cannot – which is equally important. That helps me set achievable goals and workable standards so that I keep myself motivated. Although, it may not always be a great idea to not strive for goals that are beyond your capacity. But, it is seldom that you try to achieve something that you know you can’t! By keeping the

My Non-Work Time Activities

Last month, on one of our regular visits to a temple, my wife and I met one of her cousins. During our interaction, which mostly concerned our families, we got to know something about each of our job profiles. One of the questions during our conversation was, “What do you do when you are not working Suyog?” That was a good question because I did not have a proper list

Is Technical Writing Skill or Ability?

I often say this to myself: Anyone can write, but everyone cannot become a writer. But, when we can (and do) learn to write, why can’t we learn to become writers? Language is a skill, which can be learned and mastered over a period of time. We must learn to follow the rules. Although subconsciously, notice that we almost always associate “writing” with “ability.” But, if that is true, why

Wabi-Sabi and Technical Communication

Wabi-Sabi is the Japanese window of perspective of the acceptance of imperfection. It centres the thought that everything in this world is imperfect, incomplete, and impermanent. And, when everything is made that way, we must strive continuously for perfection, by making it a habit to improve ourselves and everything we do. This post is a call to realize the importance of imperfection in our lives. Imperfection, which I believe is

Rhetoric Series: Part 1

This is the first part of the series of posts. The second part is appropriately linked in the comments section of the post. Rhetoric, as a study, is increasingly becoming relevant in the technical communication industry. Writers, editors are now feeling the need to incorporate a rhetorical approach to improving the effectiveness of their work… and hope that it improves the readability (readership?). Note: This stub contains the link to the article,

yad yad ãcarati…

yad yad ãcarati śreşţhas tat tad evetaro janaḥ sa yat pramãņaṁ kurute lokas tad anuvartate Whichever and however a great personality conducts himself common men follow; whatever he accepts as authority that and that alone certainly all the world will follow. Therefore, a leader must preach what he is taught and teach as he preaches. Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 3, Verse 21

The Knowledge of the Knowledge.

There isn’t anyone in this world who knows more than they don’t know. But, there are those who feel that way! Based on the famous thought from Confucius, this post relates our knowledge about knowledge, and the connection of it with technical communication; read on. Note: This stub contains the link to the article, which is tucked within the site. The stub is for only referential and record-keeping purposes.

Categories

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 670 other subscribers

Marked as ‘Read’ on Goodreads

© 2021 The Wordsmith . Theme by Viva Themes.
google.com, pub-2035719743358482, DIRECT, f08c47fec0942fa0