Between Varnas and Insights Discovery

My contemplation on a day-long training I attended—it was an Insights Discovery workshop—inspired me to write this post.

To tell you the truth, I can reveal the learning from the course in one line: introspecting the self, while respecting the others’ behavior. But, applying is learning is the real challenge. That’s because our thoughts preoccupy our mind. So, we cannot respect other’s perspective and have a fruitful conversation. Anyway, our today’s discussion is hardly about that challenge. So, I will keep off it.

Amongst the many things that I now register on spiritual grounds, there’s one thing has had its profound effect on me. It is that when I take insights from my past and apply them to my future, the life’s pattern becomes visible. This is like a jigsaw puzzle. The trick is not in solving it part by part. But, in setting the boundaries first so that the big picture becomes clear.

The Insights Discovery is a behavioral tool from Carl Jung, who through the tool, tried to define our nature. His analysis is that each one of us is a combination of the following four behavioral styles:

  • Red: The one who prefers brief information
  • Blue: The one who prefers details
  • Green: The one who is full of compassion
  • Yellow: The one who seeks involvement

Today, we are busy running a rat race of earning more than others, spending more than others, and possessing more than others. It is this thought of defining every one using four colors that sounded familiar to me.

The ancient Indian wisdom of dividing people into the following four Varnas is similar:

  • Brahmana: The one who prefers details; structured result-driven content.
  • Kshatriya: The one who wishes to be at the forefront; the leader.
  • Vaishya: The thinker; the strategist; the money-minded; the observer.
  • Kshudra: The one who is a great worker; the action lover.

Mind the word, please. Varna, according to the Vedas, is comparable to the English word classification. Back then, classification of Varnas would depend on an individual’s deeds, willingness, and capabilities. Today, the word inaccurately translates to mean caste.

What I do not want you to do is map those four Varnas 1:1 with those four colors. That would be incorrect. As a conclusion to the workshop, the instructor told us to be considerate of others. She told us to stay away from making fun of people based on their color preferences.

The fact is, we all have those four colors in us. Yes, one color is dominant within us all. Likewise, we all are a mix of those four Varnas. And, we all have a different Varna dominant. Whilst we are all different, we continue to be a combination of the same values. How true.

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Rediscovery

Amidst the bidders, for whom
Spoken words make the market,
I resort to words unspoken
To be the voice of my own.

Survived, I have
Through nights and days.
To survive within each moment,
I call upon my soul.

Witnessing two reflections,
Having faith in faith, I
Echo with the right one
To shatter the illusory mirror.

Floating in the quietude,
I lay in pleasurable languor,
Flashing mysterious memories.
The euphoric touch is worth an adore.

Enjoying my thoughtlessness,
Journeying through imagination,
Seeking the nomadic contentment—
Aren’t they my usual writing chore?

Explored, I may have,
The footprints of many.
I wish a stroll along the path
That I will tread sometime soon.
© Suyog Ketkar

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Micropoetry: Memoir

What you have left folded
Within the wrinkles of life,
Becomes evident only when
I realize that you gave
More than what I ever gained.
©Suyog Ketkar
#Gogyohka
#Micropoetry

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The Writer’s Chronicles – Episode 12

Pronunciation Issues

Episode 12 - Pronunciation Issues

For full resolution, visit: https://Pixton.com/ic:4bu2npwx

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This Post Ain’t Got Nothing

Usually, double negatives are absolute No-No anywhere. But, I bring this up for discussion because I see some of us use them—in workplaces and outside. Now, why would we use them? Because we hear people around us using them. Simple logic: if everyone is using it, it must be right. Oh, you can blame it on Hollywood’s portrayal of the good Ol’ Texas ranches and Cowboys, too.

A double negative is when you use two negatives together. For example, “I don’t know nothing.” The trouble is that there are exactly two interpretations of it. First, the obvious deduction “I know, at least, something.” And, second, its distant cousin, “I, literally, don’t know anything.” It is quite possible that while you wished to say (and mean) the latter one, you end up being understood as meaning the first one. It is confusing.

So, AVOID using it. How do you avoid using it? Simple. Use one negative expression. Just say (and, hopefully, mean) “I don’t know anything”.

But, not always will you or can you avoid. For example, “She didn’t go unnoticed in the party”. In this case, we wish to say that there, indeed, was someone who took a notice of her. You should dare to use a double negative only in situations like these. I say dare for a reason: look at the title of this post. Did you see how in some cases two negatives make a positive?

Let us say, the English and math do have something in common. The exception is, two “minuses” don’t always make a “plus” in the English language.

Happy writing.

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Change of Seasons

The chirping of birds,
Who, at the Mango tree,
Celebrate the
Change of seasons,
Welcoming the days of glory
Bidding the days of grim.

The drumming noise, tapping on
Your windows, epilogues the
Change of seasons, And
Highlights the crow feet on your face,
That once were ironed out,
Filling you in joy to the brim.

The last leaf, dry, falling,
Which once prompted the
Change of seasons, now
Sits atop a stone,
Crowning the idol that
People worship as Him.

©Suyog Ketkar


Image courtesy: The shutterbug within me.

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